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in the united states, i have to be honest with you. i love the united states, i admire the united states. >> rose: and you're heavily invested here. >> yes, the united states is the leader of the world. it's going to be the leader of the world for many years to come. forget china's going to come out you're down. >> rose: that means? >> when you have a country has $14 trillion of cumulative debt and its g.d.p. around $14 million and both competing, that's not good. >> rose: debt or g.d.p.? >> yes. and when you have a budget deaf sit of a trillion dollars going for the foreseeable fueler, it's unacceptable. when you have economic vices that hit you badly and it was contagious, things are not we were there but you can get out of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bin talal for the hour next. ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. he's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him as one of the world's 25 most wealthiest people. "time" magazine
as the standard for their aspirations of course, the disappointed the arab world and the united states to nothing to prevent to the partition of the arab lands or those countries empires nor did american come to the assistance of the arab world when the united states returned after the second world war it was a dominant power to subordinate the middle east with priorities but with the election of barack obama united states seem to be on the threshold of a new era of positive and engagement and i have come here he told his audience to seek a new beginning between the united states and moslems around the world based upon mutual interest and mutual respect. he spoke of years of mistrust and of the needs to say openly of the things that we say in our hearts. there must be a sustained effort to listen to each other and learn from each other and to seek common ground. this language of mutual respect and understanding represented a total reversal of policies to the white house. gone was the language of the war on terror obamacare had requested staffers gone was the ambiguity over torture that had underm
worry that the united states may sink into deflation and that was one consequence of the rate hitting zero bound. limiting the scope. those decisions in this period were faced with the risk of hitting zero-bound, policy makers should control the rates and being constrained by the lower bound on the policy interest rate. although these were warranted in policies in subsequent years, the question remains if the policy was necessary. since we cannot know how the economy would evolve under policies, the answer to this question is conjectual. one approach by this question is to compare policies during this period and the recommendations from the taylor rule, developed by john taylor of stanford university. this approach is subject to a number of indications. notably simple policy rules like the taylor rule are only rules of thumb and important people can disagree about the details of such rules. moreover simple rules may leave out factors that may be relevant such as the risk of the policy rate hitting zero-bound. which is why we don't make policy based on such rules alone. for these reaso
interference even as the united states reportedly is more deeply involved than ever in secret military missions there. >>> united states and russia move closer to a new deal to reduce nuclear arm. has president obama succeeded in the resetting relations with moscow? >>> on the 65th anniversary of the liberation of the auschwitz nazi death camp, we will show you how survivors are coping all these years later. >>> and the smash hit "avatar" makes its way to china. it's that or a new film about the life of confucius. >>> from the different perspectives of reporters and analysts from around the globe, this is "worldfocus." major support has been provided by rosalind p. walter and the peter g. peterson foundation, dedicated to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. and additional funding is provided by the following supporters -- >>> good evening. i'm daljit dhaliwal in new york. we begin tonight with the issue of terrorism and the escalating battle against it in yemen. shortly after the attempted bombing of the u.s. jetliner on christmas day,
, fancially, with the crisis you'r in rit now, new a mess. new a mess in t united states, i have to be hones with you. i love the united states, admire the united ates. >> rose: a you're heavily invested here. >>es, the united stateis the leader othe world. it's gng to be the leader of the wod for many years to come. foet china's goin to come out you're down. rose: that means? >> when yohave a country has $14 trilli of cumulative debt anits g.d.p. around $14 millioand both competing, that's notood. >>ose: debt or g.d.p.? >> yes. and when you have a budget deaf sit of a trillion dollars going for the foreseeab fueler, it's unacceptable. when you have economic ces that hit you badly andt was contagio, things are not we were the but you can get o of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bi talal for the ur next. ( coca-cola 5-note mmonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communicaons from our studios in w york city, is is charlie rose. rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. 's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him asne of the wod's 25ost wlthiest ople. "tim mazine dubbed him th
with you. i love thenited states, i mire the united states. >> rose: and you're heavily invested he. >> yes,the united states is t leader of the world. it's going to be t leader of the world formany years to come. forget china's going to come out you'reown. >> rose: thameans? >> when you have a coury has $14 trillion of cumulive debt and its g.d.p. around $14 million and both competin that's not good. >> rose: debt or d.p.? >> yes. and wn youave a buet deaf sit of a trillion dolrs going for the foreseeable fuer, it's unacceptable. when you he economic vices that hit youadly and it was contagious, things a not we were the but you can get o of it. >> rose: prince alwaleed bi talal for the ur next. ( coca-cola 5-note mmonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communicaons from our studios in w york city, is is charlie rose. rose: princeal alwaleed bin talal is here. 's chairman of the kickdom investment company. "forbes" ranks him asne of the wod's 25ost wlthiest ople. "tim mazine dubbed him the arabian warren buett. his fi has major stakes in banks, hotel and mea coanies. his largest vestment is i
concern for the united states. and then it seems to falter for a number of reasons. it appears that progress is made but then when it goes back to iran, the deal that was worked out falls apart. was this planned on the part of the iranian government? or was this truly just some sort of miscommunication by those who were in geneva and said, yes, we can do this, and it gets back to tehran, it doesn't work. >> yeah, i don't think i would bury that proposal. it's still ongoing. the suggestion -- >> you think this is still open? >> still open. initially, iran actually accepted the u.n./u.s. proposal, which was enrichment would be taking place in russia, in france. then they backed away from that. but -- >> just to remind people, this is so that the nuclear material, in theory, would not be then able to be used in some sort of weapon. >> right. it would be enriched abroad and then given to iran in limited amounts for medical purposes. and iran originally accepted that. then when it went to tehran, there was obviously, behind closed doors, division. they rejected that. >> are we suppo
in the united states had to be ground and because of money and power and they always say van dare was like family to bush. we're dealing with these leaders that making deals back home deals with people and then all of the sudden they come back you know and roost here and then you wonder why we're being attacked. we're spending our own money to give this money to these people for energy to come back and kill us with our own money. when we going to wake up? you know? it's like we're being directed in one way and then when we make deals with these people they're suppose to be the good guy and look what happens. host: thanks for the call. "washington post" says al qaeda benefits for decades worth of miss stepped in yemen. first of all u.s. commandos are trained encounter tactics. many say the war could arrive too late to change the trajectory in yemen. since the u.s.s coal attacked the nation has been past toward the illusion that the government is weak to control swats in the country. it's stretched thin and separatist movement in the south. it's got high employment unemployment rate and al
income of the united states. what's the best gauge of the economy may well be what you'll see on the ground. in beijing, the financial crisis has been a story they've read in the papers. people worried earlier this year, there are a lot of signs that at least in this corner, things are okay. it builds confidence, especially when so many other countries are suffering from a recession. but the government says 8% is the minimum needed to keep this economy going. there's a belief that the most terrible times are over, which means the targets set for 2010 may well be even higher. melissa khan al jazeera, beijing. >>> a few other economic items tonight. the u.s. labor department indicated the number ofuv americans filing for unemployment benefits increased by an unexpected 36,000 last month to 482,000. in europe, lloyd's banking group said it will cut another 585 jobs next year, on top of the already 15,000 reported job cuts last year. general motors said today it will cut more than 8,300 more jobs across europe in its opal subsidiary. gm will close this opal factory u 2600 workers.
you have to speak to it? >> oh, sure, yes, i do. gularly. here in the united states, in europe and in the middle east. that assertion is based on the assumption that the united states cannot at the same time be totally committed to israel's security-- which we are-- and be totally committed to the creation of the palestinian state-- which we are. and i believe that those are not mutually exclusive. to the contrary, that i believe they are mutually reinforcing. it will help israel get security for its people if the palestinians have a state and this issue is over. >> rose: george mitchell for the hour. next. if you've had a coke in the last 20 years, ( screams ) you've had a hand in giving college scholarships... and support to thousands of our nation's... most promising students. ♪ ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george mitchell is here. he is president obama's special envoy to the middle east, the former maine senator and majority leader has a proven record of brokerin
barack obama, the u.s. president, that there will be further attacks on the united states unless he takes steps to resolve the palestinian situation. in an audiotape obtained by al- jazeera on sunday, the al qaeda chief, praised the nigerian accused of the christmas day bombing." we would give a listen to a translation of that tape. -- we will get a listen to a translation of that tape. >> made peace beyond those that osama bin laden brings guidance to. our message, carried by words, conveyed to you through the flame of the hero, we have proved that the heroes of 9/11 can be effective. the message is that america will never dream of living in peace unless we lived it in palestine. it is not fear -- it is not fair that you enjoy a safe life while our brothers in gaza suffered greatly. with god's will, we will continue as long as you continue to support israel. peace be on those that follow the lead of guidance. host: that tape was released yesterday. first, a quick political note, marion barry is set to announce his retirement after seven terms, according to two sources. the move would mak
to strike the united states and were recruiting operatives to do so. the intelligence community did not aggressively follow up and prioritize streams of information related to a possible attack against the homeland. second, this contributed to a larger failure analysis, a failure to connect the dots of intelligence that existed across our intelligence community and which together could have revealed that abdul mutallab was planning an attack. third, this in turn fed into shortcomings in the watch listing system which resulted in this person not being placed on the no-fly list, thereby, allowing him to board that plane in amsterdam for detroit. in summary, the u.s. government had the information scattered throughout the system to potentially on the cover this plot and disrupt the attack rather than of failure to collect or share intelligence, this was a failure to connect and understand the intelligence that we already had. and that is why we took swift action in the days following christmas, including updating the terrorist watch list system and adding more individuals to the no-fly
barrier, for these issues. in the united states we have the high-paying jobs here in the united states. host: how can this be done? caller: i am not certain about how you can do this. it seems that corporate america would rather pay the lower costs, then keeping the labor here in the united states. the government may be able to find a way to keep these jobs here in the united states. host: thank you very much. the "richmond times dispatch." they have a report on the comeback of the stock market, and how the seemed unimaginable. that is one take on the economy. baltimore, you are up right now. how are you doing? caller: i would say the number one policy issue for me is afghanistan. and there is the economy and jobs. i have done quite a bit of reading. this is reminding me of vietnam. i think that this is taking so many resources from the country and it will be hard to address any other problem. we are approaching this in the middle east, and this is not helping to solve the problems over there. more money should be devoted to domestic problems. i would like to see a lot done with public
focus by the united states on the problems of terrorism and in giving assistance to the government of yemen and following 2003 when there was a sense that al qaeda had been defeat indeed yemen, much of that dropped off. the amount 06 attention, the amount of resources that we gave to yemen dropped off significantly. and since 2006, with the reconstitution of al qaeda in yemen, only platedly has the united states sort of focused again on the problem there and of course the reason why we're talking about it this morning is because omar farooq aomar that took took omar farooq kathwari was coming from yemen. caller: my question is how long have we been with this war against yemen? i mean, i don't mean to go to a conspiracy theory but i read in ha general petraeus and another went down there so when tough head of arms services committee go to yemen, they are not just going to see if it's -- >> well, i wouldn't characterize it at all as a war in yemen. and senator mccain is my former boss. i worked for him for 5 1/2 years on foreign policy and so i can state categorically what was on his
at those the washington post. calling for allowing haitians in the united states who are here illegally to find work. "the new york times" echoing "the washington post." the first phone call comes from chris on independent mine in ohio. good morning. caller: the morning. everybody keeps getting -- host: go ahead, we can hear you. caller: pat robertson was right. it did -- they did sell their souls to the devil. not that we should not help -- we should help. they went with the french -- now they're asking americans to save us. host: what part of history are you saying? caller: pat roberts and back -- said back in 1761, i think, that they chose to sell their souls to the devils -- the french, communist, but they are begging us to help. we cannot even support ourselves. we are getting ripped off by our own government. how can we support them, too? i don't understand -- we are starving to death and, yes, i understand it was a natural disaster but it was not our fault and that understand we should help, there is no problem with that, but why is it we are starving to death, too. host: what ab
in facilitating the work i have done during the last three decades. one was the discovery in the united states initially and later canada, australia, united kingdom, and thousands of nazi war criminal -- criminals had emigrated posed as innocent refugees and allowed to enter and build their lives for themselves. one was the fact ad is the stage at this point* not much was not about the very important role the collaborators had played in the implementation of the final solution. the other was the soviet union and the fall of communism that opened brand new possibilities. i actually want to start with something else that is the basis for our efforts to bring out these two just is. i would summarize for the following points. it is interesting these questions are also asked 35 years ago. not now we're for relating the principles because the suspects are in their eighties. even with suspects in the '50s and '60s, 35 years ago the question was asked this is worthwhile? should they be put on trial? so many years have passed since the crime has been committed. i answer that, first, the passage of time
blames the united states and israel for the assassination of one of its nuclear scientists. the bomb attack now ratcheting up tensions and iran's nuclear standoff with the west. i'm wolf blitzer in cnn's command center, for breaking news, politics and extraordinary reports from around the world. you're in "the situation room." >>> all that coming up, but this just coming into "the situation room." a new breach of airline security, this time it's a potential health threat, not a terror threat. u.s. airways now confirms a person on the cdc's do not board list flew from philadelphia to san francisco on saturday. let's go to our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. what happened here? >> someone somewhere along the way dropped the ball. the way it words is the centers for disease control has a list of people who they think are basically a threat to public health, shouldn't be on a plane. this person was apparently on that list, the cdc gives the list to the tsa. the tsa is supposed to give that list to individual airlines, but something went wrong here. i find this next part a b
-election to the united states senate. on each of these occasions, i have begun my remarks by observing that every important journey in life begins and ends at home. today is no exception. what is different about today, however, is not to announce the beginning of yet another campaign for the united states senate, but rather to announce that after 35 years of representing the people of connecticut and the united states congress, i will not be a candidate for re-election this november. i want to begin these very brief remarks by expressing my deepest gratitude to the wonderful people of connecticut for the remarkable privilege of being elected eight times over the past four decades to our national assembly. you have honored me beyond words with your confidence. let me quickly add that there have been times when my positions and actions have caused some of you to question that confidence. i regret that. but it is equally important that you know that i have never wavered in my determination to do the best job for our state and our nation. i love my job as your senator. i always have, still do. howeve
of the united states? >> greta: and the senator said what to you, sir? >> the senator said that he thought that it was constitutional. that the only reservation he had was the individual mandate that's in the bill. he said that would probably have to go to the supreme court. but he believed that the supreme court would approve it as being constitutional. >> greta: about how many people were present at this town hall meeting? >> by my guess around 280. there's 240 seats in the hall plus roughly 40 people standing either by the walls or sitting in the aisles. all the seats were filled. >> greta: it is considered a conservative area do you consider yourself republican, democrat, independent? >> i'm an active member of the republican party of waukesha county. >> greta: what percentage in the room were republicans and what percentage were democrats? >> i have no idea, but i do know that someone else took a straw poll of how many people favored this piece of legislation and how many were opposed. there were exactly 12 people in favor of it and everyone else opposed. so that would be roughly 90%
started talking about a stimulus package in the united states that was coupled -- and i stress this point -- that was coupled with an indication of how we are going to deal with the united states' medium term budget problems. we will see the largest buildup in peacetime public debt. how we deal with that is critical. i was talking about an "l" shaped recovery, i was not really focusing on the downside risks that i see. i would say some of them have been mentioned and have a very good chance of materializing in 200010. -- in 2010. the middle of 2010 is the short term. the long term is beyond 2010. the full risks that i would indicate -- the four risks that i would indicate, and i would put them in the order of the way i worry about them. the first is the situation in europe. philip correctly mentioned parallels with the convertibility plan. these countries really have to be dealing with budget deficits that are in double digits in the middle of a recession without having an exchange rate mechanism or independent monetary policy to deal with it. that is a risk. that is a train wreck waiting
other nation in the united states. there are more is really nasdaq companies than japanese, than canadian and british and german than anything. it's extraordinary. capitalism hasn't been shown to fail. capitalism has been shown to work and here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self pity this of course encouraged by the victimhood. one of the things on my radio show is the michael medved show where we are proud to say every day i am not a victim the idea of american victimhood suggests our standard of living and difficulties in our choices it's much lower. we can't live the kind of lives our parents live and it's getting worse and everyone has heard this. it is nonsense. robert wright. heritage in this building has some terrific work on this and i quote him extensively in the book. if you actually look at any meaningful measure of living standards in the united states the progress under the capitalist america particularly since 1980 has been dazzling, unprecedented. the options available to people, the extended life expectancy and for college we are now at a st
.org. >>> in yemen where the plot was planned, the united states has reopened its embassy after it was closed for two days because of security concerns. u.s. officials say successful counter terrorism operations by yemen had allowed them to resume operations. however, yemen's interior ministry issued its own statement, saying that the security situation in the capital had always been under control. and yemeni security officials say the government has sent thousands of troops to take part in a campaign against al qaeda in three provinces in recent days. as we have seen, the united states has been emphasizing an increasingly cooperative relationship with yemen in the last few days. underscored by comments over the weekend by president obama and a visit to yemen by general david petraeus. the commander of u.s. forces in the region. however, the "washington post" reports today that senior yemeni officials are playing down the partnership, fearing that the government could pay a heavy political price for aligning itself with the united states and appearing too weak to control al qaeda by itself. the artic
bork for the supreme court of the united states, and september 17 when i traveled to philadelphia with the president, it was a thursday and i missed my opportunity to question judge bork. and i got that opportunity on saturday morning, and i was the only one there and had -- at least there were only a few people there and had an opportunity to question judge bork for an hour and a half. and ultimately, played a key role in the rejection of the nomination of judge bork who believed in original intent and had a very, very different view of the constitution. did not believe in due process of law. that was not part of the constitution, and he disagreed with the incorporation of the ten amendments through the due process clause to apply to the states. and that was a momentous supreme court hearing. during the years of president george h.w. bush, there were many matters of note. one that stands out was the confirmation proceeding as to justice souter, and when justice souter was up for confirmation and i participated in that as a member of the judiciary committee as i have participated
virginia. it is a huge room filled with computers. it is basically the brain of the united states intelligence system. any tip -- it was created after september 11. this was the place that was supposed to answer the 9/11 commission report on the failure to connect the dots. this is the place. this is one of its first big tests. this is a place in northern virginia were all the data comes in. there's not a single agency that is supposed to run the show entirely. it's under the office of the director of national intelligence. it is under the director. it is not any single persons jurisdiction. all the different agencies are supposed to be participating. they are all supposed to share the data and make sure they do not miss things. in design, it is supposed to do exactly what it should have done here. it did not. why? i do not know the answer. caller: good morning. in the regulatory world, there's a thing called root cause analysis when a problem occurs. you look to find out what the true systemic cause of the problem was. when i look at what i know, this was not a system failure. th
started in earnest in the late 1940's, we became very much a war that in the 1950's the united states of the soviet union were locked in to an existential crisis. it was a sort of stable crisis over the years, but a crisis nonetheless. we chatted a enormous nuclear power. we each have the ability to destroy the other country. and tonight, destroying most of the world. so we produced what was called a balance of terror, were both leaders on both sides, whenever there was a real crisis did not ever want to be pushed to a point of having to use nuclear weapons. and that governs the way we thought about our policy in almost every part of the world. now as a reporter in that environment, and as they moscow correspondent, and i remember i was the moscow correspondent during some of the most acute berlin crises, during the cuban missile crisis, and a number of others as well in the middle east. i believe now that i thought then that in pursuing my story, i wanted us to win. i didn't want the soviet union to gain and manage over the united states. i don't know that i literally wrote stories i
to help haiti address its own problems. many haitian americans living in the united states have technical expertise in areas such as agriculture, education, health care and infrastructure and would like to return to haiti to assist their people. my bill creates a mechanism to transfer this knowledge in order to meet the needs and the goals of haiti. beyond that we need to ensure that we find other innovative ways to build human capacity, such through education alex changes, programs like i have proposed and other members, the chirly chisholm act, now more than ever, haiti needs the support of its neighbor to the north. even as we deal with our own problems during these tough economic times, we must not turn a blind eye to the untold human suffering just off our shores. today we express our continued support for haiti, we stand in solidarity with the haitians and the haitian americans who have lost loved ones, with the united states citizens still trapped on the island. we stand in solidarity with the rescue workers who have devoted their time and their treasure to help people they do not
the american people, seized the air-traffic system, causing the united states to spend much more money on screening and personnel. suggesting again to the american people that their government cannot protect them. these are choices between bad actions. host: let's hear from one of the callers. ernest, good morning. independent line. caller: sir, i want to find out if you are one of the good cia guys. you say we are not -- you say that we are fighting an enemy that does not exist. al qaeda is a name that we gave them, they did not give it to themselves. i do not know how in tune you are with the last attempt of a terrorist attack. could you explain to the people what a false flag operation is? then i would like to know this -- during the reporting of the past terrorist attack, eyewitness accounts have been suppressed. we are talking about the well- dressed gentleman that helped the accused hijacker or bomber to get on the plane, past security, by passing it all with no passport, no identification, no visa. we are talking about the gentleman that was on the flight the entire time. host:
that a nigerian was being prepared for attacks in the united states on the homeland. my understanding is the least one of those intersects i think there were several specifically mentioned umar farouk abdulmutallab, the first two names. if you put it together with the fact this suspect's own father and not just anyone off the street as it has been stated by some in the intelligence community but a respected nigerian banker went physically to the embassy and talked to not one agency but to, the department and central intelligence agency and wasn't in missing person report. he said he was conservative his son, he's in yemen, and the nsa intercepted background. follow those meetings with written communications and telephone calls. we know that yemen is a hotbed of terrorism. apparently intelligence community didn't receive a possibility al qaeda and the arab peninsula might attack the homeland which is the story is another failure of imagination and it seems al qaeda is fixation on aviation system all of it seems to me not just in retrospect but before the effect of to have been enough to put on high
to establish a good relationship with the president of the united states because the united states is so a important to our vital interests, economic, security interests. they are our best ally and closest neighbor. they are our very best friend in the world as well and we should not forget that. we have established a good relationship. we have been working to align our approach is on a number of economic and environmental issues. i enjoy working with president obama. i do not envy him. his challengers are much greater than mine. they have so many more global responsibilities dain canada but the problems with the economy, health care, you name it, there frankly so much more. i do not envy his position. as i have said to my american friends, we are here to try and be helpful while protecting our own interests. >> you were recently in china. let's get your perception of the premier who seemed to give you a dressing down for taking so long to come. they are in very powerful players. when was your perception? >> we attend international summits quite regularly and i have had a chance to have
on election 2010. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> i am less interested in passing out blame than i am in learning from and correcting these mistakes to make us safer. for ultimately the buck stops with me. as president i have a solemn responsibility to protect our nation and our people and when the system fails, it is my responsibility. >> president obama taking responsibility this week for america's closest brush with airline terror in years. he suggested no one will be fired at least for now and he ordered a series of reforms including tougher rules for putting people on the no fly list, and more widespread distribution of intelligence reports. the president also renewing his declaration of war on al qaeda and its growing presence in yemen. cnn international security correspondent paula newton is in yemen for us. we'll go to her in a moment. also here in washington are our homeland security correspondent jeanne meserve and former homeland security inspector general clark kent irvin. thanks to al
going to come to the fore. i think independents might. in many states in the united states today, there are more registered independents or unenrolled or the states have different names for them. who are not affiliated with either party. and i think there are more people -- i'm not the only person who is fed up with the high level of partisanship, and i think, you know, there have already been independents elected governors in some states, some local communities are getting rid of party designations for, you know, races for mayor and city council, so i think we may see slowly perhaps a rise of the independents politically. >> thank you. >> hi, i'm from washington jefferson college. you actually already answered two of my questions, but i guess i was wondering, since barack obama already, you know, tried to enhance the role of the congress, by letting them do what they're supposed to do, do you think that he will continue this encouragement and have them keep doing what they're supposed to do or do you think that the criticism of what he tried to do will maybe stop him in the futu
, and here in the united states there is a tremendous amount of self-pity that is encouraged by the victim. one of the things in my ratio is it's the michael medved show where we're proud to say everyday i am not a victim, the idea of american victimhood suggest that our standard of living and our difficulties and our choices, it's all much lower, we can't live the kind of lives that our parents live and it's getting worse. everyone has heard this. it is nonsense. now, robert rector rodger at heritage writer in the building has done terrific work on this and i quote him extensively in the book. if you actually look at any meaningful measure of living standards in the united states, the progress under capless american, particularly since 1980, has been dazzling, has been unprecedented. the options that are available to people, the extended life expectancy, college, we're now at at a stage where the majority of american young people in every ethnic group, are pursuing some form of post high school graduation after they graduate from high school. this is phenomenal. sometimes that education m
on iran might precipitate a wider third war for the united states in the greater middle eastnd we couldn't afford that. we thought the smartest strategy was to build up sanctions, sport for sanctions against iran and we'll see that, i think, play out in real life over the next couple of months. we wanted to shine a bright light and a stronger light on the human-rights abuses of the iranian government. we wanted to draw a military cordon around iran to contain it and the united states, i think, is in a good position to do that. and we wanted to play for the long-term because we wanted... we didn't want to do anything that would movement in iran and we thought the early use of force might effectively kill that opposition movement. and so in playing for the long term, we assume that there is some kind of solution here short of the use of u.s. military force. that is the hand we played that happens to be my own view as well. >> rose: all right. let me go to gary, the iranian hand. which has been influenced, obviously, by the political turmoil after the election. was that factored in or did t
resistence did you run into trying to accomplish it? >> well, charlie, we felt that the united states was actually in better shape now than it was a year ago. president obama, we felt, had done more to advance the agenda because he has essentially put the iranians on the defenve. and the iranians are more isolated now than they were when president obama was negotiating. so we were playing for the long term in the simulated game. the american team that i lead was trying to position all of our friends and partners to put greater pressure on the iranians. we wanted very much to avoid an early israeli use of force because while we are very sympathetic, of course, to the israeli predictment, we felt that an israeli attack on iran might precipitate a wider third war for the united states in the greater middle east and we couldn't afford that. we thought the smartest strategy was to build up sanctions, sport for sanctions against iran and we'll see that, i think, play out in real life over the next couple of months. we wanted to shine a bright light and a stronger light on the human-rights a
you are president of the united states. that doesn't work when you come into washington d.c. and you have people like nancy pelosi and harry reid and politicians on the hill that will call your-- claw your eyes out if you stand still. he has not asserted himself. he has not been the barack obama of iowa. i keep waiting for the barack obama of iowa. >> rose: what was the barack obama of iowa reasons barack obama of iowa was a guy that reached out to republicans and to independents who would come in to me, when we were going around iowa doing our show there during the caucus saying you know what, this guy isn't wedded to all of those fights and those ideaological battles that bill clinton and hillary clinton and george w. bush fought from 1968 on. he's going to take us forward. the problem is he has turned his presidency over, over the past year, to people whose political careers were framed that way. i think he's going to have to stop being the law professor, start being the leader. i think he's going to start being more lbj. >> rose: back to you for health care, adam. is health-care
the united states and japan, between the foreign minister and secretary clinton. they're really starting to cement their relationship. i can sense the chemistry and the trust developing between the two. that's deeply gratifying. in addition, the secretary gave a speech really outlining -- to interact with asia when it comes to its fledgling international organizations. and so even though the trip was abriefiated, i think we got quite a bit of work done. as p.g.a. indicated, this is today we're marking the 50th anniversary of the u.s.-japan security alliance, the security partnership. it's no exaggeration to say that it has been the cornerstone and the foundation of everything that we've managed to accomplish over the course of the last few generations inin asia. and we hear this not just from japanese friends but throughout the region. over the course of the last couple of months, as the united states and japan worked together on a series of challenging matters, one of the things that's been most interesting and gratifying is how much we hear from other countries in the region, from sout
to be a sustained policy after the first action, does the united states then support future actions or does it say never again, that this cannot occur again? all the while dealing with the aftermath of then is really strike and the implications that entail. finally, if this does not come to pass, and iran, diplomacy does not work in israel does not strike then we are going to be focusing a large part of the coming year and afterwards on confidence-building and reassurance among our allies as we try to build a containment regime to deal with nuclear iran. i would raise the question one of the main challenges we will face in confidence building is how to convince the allies that a country that was unable to prevent iran from achieving the outcome we defined as unacceptable, that is acquiring nuclear weapons, will also be able to have the willpower and resolve to deter nuclear iran and we will face challenges in our theater engagement strategy and trying to build a containment architecture to do with nuclear iran if that comes to pass. just a couple of quick comments about the whole issue of strategi
students from all over the united states. i've been associated with this program as faculty director for about 10 years. and this is a program which is very dear to my heart. and we have consistently had some of the best, most authoritative speakers available. and cerda, this is true of juan zarate. there is a scene in the 1975 movie about the watergate invasion, all the presidents men. and there's a meeting in an underground washington garage and watch how holbrook, playing an informant known by the name of deep throat, tells robert redford playing bob warburg, the "washington post" reporter, that if he wants to find out who is responsible for the water great burglary, at democratic party headquarters, at the watergate, you should follow the money. well, we have some here today who has followed money. in his capacity as deputy assistant secretary of the treasury. and this was a job that really involves one of the most complex tasks in the antiterrorism effort. that have these people get their money, how they spend their money, and it takes a person with uncommon diligence and uncomm
just returned from yemen. you had talks with the president of yemen. is the united states going to have direct involvement there, in other words, troops on the ground or launching strikes from inside yemen? >> well, in fact, you taukd to the yemeni foreign minister, as well, and he was quite clear that yemen does not want to have american ground troops there and that's a good, good response for us to hear, certainly. >> wonderful ground troops there. >> no, of course, we would always want a host nation to deal with a problem itself. we want to help, we're providing assistance so we're going to provide more assistance in the course of this year than we did last year and after i think having zeerode it out back, if you recall, '08. this is an effort that we want to help them to deal with a problem that threatens their very rid of government and their very existence as you know it. >> you talk about providing more aid. from what i can gather, aide w increased by $2 trillion in 2008 and 2010. you said when you were there it was going to double this year or next year. is that going to happe
, the united states's perspective on relations with the muslim world and where do we go from here with the muslim world? for much of the past decade since the events of 9/11 we talked a lot about the muslim world. in our media it has become part of the language of our politics. it matters a lot to us. thinking often is the united states or the muslim world are not on the right path -- not on the same page. we fought a lot about how to fix that relationship and particularly think about writing those things that are not going right. that context, that worries us more than the question of extremism. the perception that the muslim world thinks too much about conservative ideas and too permissive towards extremism and this is something that will be addressed for policy consent. much of that is quite true. extremism is an issue of paramount concern. it is a foreign policy consideration. it is the major focus of u.s. foreign policy and to that extent it is also the way in which many americans view the muslim world. but there's also a tendency that it becomes too all consuming. it becomes
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